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Lingo Consulting
 


So, where are the jobs and how can you find them?

Talk to everyone you know. This may make you uncomfortable, but networking is key, and personal introductions are always more effective than a resume from a complete stranger via email. Friends and relatives know you best, so who better to keep their eyes and ears open for new opportunities for you? Caution though. You may have to help your friends and relatives think about who they know who might be able to help you, so be prepared to jog their memory about possible connections.

Expand your geographic search. Now is a time for flexibility, and that includes considering a move to where the jobs are. Even if you cannot move across the country, you may want to consider looking at job locations that may have a longer commute, but wouldn't require you to sell your house or uproot your family. Expanding your geographical options doesn't have to be a bad thing-maybe it will give you an opportunity to go to a new place you've always wanted to go. And don't forget about international job searches.

Social network your way into a job. Social networking sites aren't just for posting funny videos and pictures. They're also great networking tools. Some sites, like Linkedin allow your contacts to introduce you to people who work at companies you are interested in, as well as write recommendations for your contacts as testimonials to your character and past accomplishments. Not only do some social networking sites have job listings on their site, they can also connect you with actual human beings at the company. Through these tools you can make connections that will distinguish you from other job seekers.

Volunteer. It seems counter intuitive to work for free when you are unemployed, but it's a great way to meet like minded people who can help. Volunteers are typically in a helpful mood, and you never know who you will meet.  And remember, the more people you meet, the more connections you have in your job search. It also keeps you busy and looks great on a resume.

 
Be a class act. Go back to your alma mater. Most have career services offices and lists of fellow alumnae who may be able to help you.
 





 

consulting, business, international, latin america, spanish language, corporate training, training, leadership, executive training, relocation, business training, expert, work, job, skill, development, spanish, english as a second language, english, argentina, brazil, travel, atlanta business, europe, politics, advice, south america, southern cone, experts